stinging nettles…to eat!

nettles

Nettles have been showing up on chi chi menus of late. These are growing along the roadside, giving them two strikes against them: 1) they are about to bloom. Nettles must be harvested before they flower. Once flowers form, harmful crystals form within the leaves that can irritate the urinary tract. 2) the roadside location means that they have been polluted by exhaust. We have plenty of nettles out in our woods, where they get less sun so are still early enough in their evolution to serve a culinary purpose. If you have ever tangled with a patch of nettles, you know that it can be a painful experience. The stinging hairs are on the underside of the leaves. Be sure to cover up and wear gloves if you want to harvest some nettles. Cooking removes the sting. Sauté, steam, boil or simply soak in water for 20 minutes and they are ready to be used just as you would spinach, chard or kale. The water left behind makes a good fertilizer.

more nettles

I can’t say that the taste differential between a quiche made with nettles and one using plain old spinach is outstanding, but there is something sort of charming about harvesting foodstuffs in the wild. The chefs around town obviously think it adds cachet to the whole “NW Style” thing.

9 Responses to “stinging nettles…to eat!”

  1. Grace Says:

    Ricki, I’ve felt the sting of the nettle and all it made me want to do was stay as far away from it as possible. Eat it, I don’t think so. However I do hear they’re very nutritious. Maybe if I’m ever destitute… :)

  2. linda Says:

    Lucky you…I’m always complaining about the lack of nettles . I had plenty of them in Suffolk . In England there is always a Dock plant near the nettle, supposedly to sooth the sting. I always made soup with them …nettles that is. yummm

  3. ricki Says:

    Grace~Nutritious, yes…but probably no more than a lot of less “exotic” fare.

    Linda~I would love to get that soup recipe.

  4. Debbie/GardenofPossibilities Says:

    Ricki, How funny, I just read a little article about this exact subject today. I think I’d file this under ‘who would’ve thought…’

  5. ricki Says:

    Debbie~Or maybe under “lost in the woods and out of gorp”.

  6. Wendy Says:

    That’s funny b/c yesterday a friend from England and his German girlfriend came into town. When she saw my campanula she said it was nettles and that she grew up eating it. The leaves do look the same. Not sure if it’s related, or if campanula is nettles, gotta check… You’re right though about the charm of harvesting foodstuffs in the wild!

  7. ricki Says:

    Wendy~Seems to be a British thing (see Linda’s comment above).

  8. linda Says:

    BBC – Radio 4 Woman’s Hour – NETTLE SOUP
    This is the recipe I use. From Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall .

  9. ricki Says:

    Linda~Thanks! I will look that up quick, before they flower.

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