foliage follow-up

mullion

Back in what I have come to call the “graveyard berm” (ironic, because I think it was Loree who once referred to berms as burial mounds) this Verbascum has placed himself in a crevice of the rock border and is happy there. I have never planted one of these, but am happy to see them pop up here and there. See that little thing that looks like a very small twig near the center? It is an insect. Fun, huh?

primrose foliage

I am in love with the foliage of primroses after the annoying little flowers have had their day. In the woodland, the flowers always look a little tatty (through no fault of their own: they bloom during full rain/slugfest season), but the leaves are perky, puckery, shiny delights.

primrose with hosta and fern

Just look how lovingly they combine with ferns and hostas

primrose with Persicaria ‘Lance Corporal’
…and especially with Persicaria ‘Lance Corporal’. Isn’t that a perfect name for the leaves with the chevron markings? It used to be called Tovara virginiana, but I didn’t know the new name until I saw it on Scott’s wonderful blog.

bronze sedum with golden creeping charlie

It will be interesting to see who will win this battle between the bronzy sedum and the golden creeping charlie. Right now I’m liking the way they are cooperating to weave a carpet of color.

Juniperus communis ‘Gold

You can see that war going on in the background here, setting the stage for Juniperus communis ‘Gold Cone’ to put on the command performance that happens only this time of year, when the new growing tips emerge all fresh and golden.

Ozothamnus ‘Sussex Silver’

Are these growing tips or flower buds on the Ozothamnus ‘Sussex Silver’? Only time will tell, as this is their first appearance in the three years we have had this plant.

sedum groundcover

Another ground-covering sedum, this a very small leaved variety, covers bumpy ground in no time. This started out as a 4″ pot from the supermarket, and it does a good job of keeping weeds at bay. I just happened to catch it when a few red petals had fallen from the Rhododendron. What are the chances of that ever happening again?

Foliage follow up comes right after Bloom Day, and is the brainchild of Pam. Best hurry on over there to see what the rest of the foliageans have to offer.

11 Responses to “foliage follow-up”

  1. susan effenberger Says:

    Hey Ricki,

    Love all the green and red tones, as well as the various textures. I’ll be out to
    visit one of these days!

    All the best,
    Susan

  2. Loree/ danger garden Says:

    Oh god…I don’t want to be the one to have cursed your berm! (but yes it was me…I once read that berms looked like elephants buried all over the suburbs, never have been able to get that out of my mind…probably because my mother is a berm lover). Anyway…on a more positive note you Ozothamnus ‘Sussex Silver’ looks AMAZING!

  3. RBell Says:

    Liking the look of that Persicaria ‘Lance Corporal’ - I have ‘Red Dragon’ which has done well; but methinks I might have to be on the lookout for the Corporal.

  4. Grace Says:

    You’re so right about the foliage of the lowly primrose. I like it much more than the flowers. Great shots.

  5. Pam/Digging Says:

    Those primrose leaves ARE delightful, but I’m really loving Persicaria lately. RBell passed some along to me, and it’s doing so well in my dry shade bed.

    I’m smiling over Loree’s dead-elephant berm comment. She’ll die to hear that I just visited the fabulous Plant Delights in Raleigh, and the whole place is bermed! I’ll have pics in a day or two, and everyone can judge for themselves if it looks like a graveyard. ;-)

  6. Jane / MulchMaid Says:

    I’m so happy to have a name for my persicaria! It was given to me as Tovara, and I speculated it was a type of persicaria - now I know which! I love your sedum-creeping charlie battlefield - I want them both to win the war. I wish a few verbascum would find their way to my garden, too: send them my way if they look lost!

  7. ricki Says:

    Susan!I hope so! In the meantime it’s nice to hear from you here.

    Loree~Not to worry: I don’t really believe in curses…the berm just has to tell me what it wants to be. Sussex is actually Richard’s plant. It’s fun to have a second gardener, tho it can sometimes get a little confrontational.

    RBell~Look out: anything you have heard about the Corporal’s drive to take over is true.

    Grace~Thanks.

    Pam~Loree is always good for a giggle.

    Jane~How’s about I pass along a flower stalk of the verbascum once it goes to seed? Could be a good excuse for another get-together over coffee.

  8. Debbie Says:

    Ricki, Like most everyone else, I am loving the Lance Corporal. I have a Gold Cone juniper too but am not overly thrilled with it. Perhaps once it gets bigger it will be a much more impressive sight (mine’s about 30″ tall). I guess it seems like one of those plants I had such high hopes for that hasn’t really delivered yet. What do you think about yours?

  9. ricki Says:

    Debbie~I guess if I had limited space, I would pass on Gold Cone. As it is, it adds a nice, year-round element to a large berm. I like it quite a lot, especially when the golden tips are just emerging, but then I am a bit of a conifer nut.

  10. lostlandscape (James) Says:

    Love the Lance Corporal, as well as the verbascum. I hear the verbascums re-sow vigorously, but my plants I’ve tried of it didn’t hang around long enough to bloom. I guess the combination of gophers and lack of water can conspire against even the most hardy of the plants… Happy (belated) foliage follow-up day!

  11. ricki Says:

    James~Lack of water shouldn’t slow down the verbascums, but gophers are a plague. R has been putting cat excrement down their holes, but so far it hasn’t slowed them down much. Stick a shovel in anywhere around here and it is sure to plunge into a tunnel.

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