Arisaema, a group of favorites

Arisaema triphyllum

When I first introduced Arisaema triphyllum to the woodland’s edge, I had visions of it forming a colony of Jack-in-the-Pulpits. That was in 2010 and there is still only one.

A. taiwanese

Frustrated by its recalcitrant ways, I added A. taiwanese from my first visit to Xera in 2013. Already it has gone from one to two blooms. Maybe it has something to do with the source?

A. taiwanese foliage

The foliage on this one is quite beautiful.

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It’s a good thing too, because the flowers hide coyly beneath the leaves. Love those patterned stems.

A. concinnum

The HPSO spring sale, Hortlandia, yielded yet another to my growing collection: A. concinnum. It is less of a shrinking violet than the others, in that the leaf bends away from the flower. As it unfurled, the leaf looked like it might be diseased or slug-damaged, but I needn’t have worried.

A. concinnum

Sorry for the out-of-focus photo, but since it is pouring rain at the moment, I’m stuck with it. I hope these close relatives can learn to get along in the colonization I have forced upon them. You can learn more about the many faces of Arisaema here. Join us over at Danger Garden by leaving a comment with a link to your favorite plant in the garden this week.

12 Responses to “Arisaema, a group of favorites”

  1. Casa Mariposa Says:

    My neighbors usually have several native jack-in-the-pulpits blooming in their rain garden but this year I didn’t see any. But after our brutal winter everything is behind. Maybe theirs are behind, too. I can only hope! They are such a cool plant. Love the foliage in your 3rd photo.

  2. Beth @ PlantPostings Says:

    I do find all the Arisaemas fascinating! You have a great collection. We have so many A. triphyllums around here–especially this year. I just let them go to seed and then the next year they pop up in unexpected places. One of these years I should do a plant swap with some of the extra plants. Great photos, too–especially the A. taiwanese!

  3. Alison Says:

    I adore Arisaemas too. I only have one, kind, though, A. triphyllum. I grew a few of mine from seed, and bought a couple of others. I too was hoping they’d grow into a little clump, but I had to make the clump myself.

  4. linda Says:

    Mine is just now starting to emerge. It doesn’t know that I nearly planted sometime over the top of it. Next year I think I’ll have to mark the spot .

  5. Loree / danger garden Says:

    I’ve never planted an Arisaema but love visiting a couple that grow at Kennedy School. Nice “fav” choice!

  6. ricki Says:

    CM~Lucky you, to have some nearby. You have to kind of get down on their level to really appreciate them, so it might get embarrassing.

    Beth~I certainly leave mine to their own devices. Seeding about would put me on cloud nine.

    Alison~Your seed-starting prowess is awe-inspiring.

    Linda~I have little stakes marking mine for that very reason.

    Loree~They look like your sort of plant, but one can only support so many obsessions.

  7. Janet/Plantaliscious Says:

    Such a fascinating group of plants, thank you for sharing, I have never grown them, and suspect my current garden is a little too dry for them.

  8. ricki Says:

    Janet~They do like it a bit damp, at least in spring. We can’t grow everything, but thanks to the web we can enjoy it all.

  9. Grace Peterson Says:

    Beautiful woodland creatures. I am jealous that I don’t have a woodland.

  10. ricki Says:

    Grace~But you have so much else going on…and you can visit my woodland any time.

  11. Evan Says:

    I missed this post! I love Arisaemas, but I haven’t brought any into my garden yet.

  12. ricki Says:

    Evan~I highly recommend them if you have a woodland setting.

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