ANLD highlights

1anld030.jpg

As promised yesterday, I’m going to show you some of the highlights of this Saturday’s ANLD tour from my point of view. One theme that ran through several gardens was the use of cor-10 steel edging to define paths. I especially loved the sinuous one above.

1anld028.jpg

Fine attention to detail is one of the hallmarks of these installations, as here, where several elements come together and dovetail perfectly.

6anld206.jpg

This was another path treatment that appealed to me.

3anld097.jpg

I’m lifting lots of ideas for plant combinations from this tour…loved the purple poppies with the Kniphofia ‘Timothy’.

3anld089.jpg

Dynamite color combinations needn’t rely on flowers.

3anld091.jpg

Seating areas offer another opportunity to play with color. I love the way these chairs add a zesty zing to the chartreuse tones of the foliage.

4anld136.jpg

Taking advantage of a small porch pulls the garden right into this seating area. I failed to photograph another seating area where I sat a while (but Danger Garden captured it perfectly). It took advantage of a driveway with large planter boxes that were on wheels so they could be moved aside when access to the garage was needed: one of many examples of the problem-solving approach taken by these designers.

5anld168.jpg

Use of materials is another interesting feature of the tour. Here, the material was poured, then carved to resemble stone.

5anld170.jpg

Nearby, in the same garden, the same material was used simply, as poured, to form raised planter boxes (personally, I preferred this approach).

2anld055.jpg

Here’s another approach to raised beds.

anldwall189.jpg

A close relative of the raised beds is this formal retaining wall of cast concrete.

lunchanld152.jpg

We were served lunch at Garden Fever!, where service is served up with a sweet smile and you can find many of the things you’ve been falling for on the tour.

anld197.jpg

Case in point: This charming wall pocket and most of the plants it contains.

3anld094.jpg

Each Designer is paired with an artist. In this case resulting in a large slumped glass luxury bird bath.

2anld077.jpg

Everyone fell hard for this garden gate. Other bloggers (links in yesterday’s post) featured close-ups, so I will give you more of a long view of its placement in the garden. This artist also created a new twist on a bottle tree that must be seen to be believed.

1anld013.jpg

I failed to ascertain if this was the work of an artist or the garden designer. Which goes to show the fine line between the two. At any rate, the carefully placed stones are part of a fountain.

3anld083.jpg

Many times the placement of ordinary elements like this large, empty pot, could pass as garden art.

2anld068.jpg

2anld080.jpg

3anld086.jpg

2anld063.jpg

2anld072.jpg

Several of the gardens had structures. This one had an eco-roof.

5anld183.jpg

The large deck off the back of the house is the result of close collaboration between the designer and the owners. They wanted several large areas for seating and/or staging groupings of potted plants. Most of the owners made a point of the problems that were creatively solved by the designers.

1anld018.jpg

I was especially taken with the planters designed by owner David P. Best. I love the assymetrical shape, which was not an easy thing to convey to the fabricator. This one, near the basement door, is painted a light color and planted with Rosemary. Another, on the front porch, is equally handsome in a darker color and planted with some sort of rush.

1anld016.jpg

A longer version.

1anld007.jpg

Notice how the foliage of the maple exactly matches the color of the door? If this were to happen in my garden, it would surely be a happy accident. I have no doubt it was intentional in this case.

1anld004.jpg

So…have I managed to pique your interest in spending your Saturday strolling through six enchanting gardens, engaging in stimulating conversation with artists, designers and owners and filing away your own set of inspirations for future projects? You might win two tickets by backtracking to yesterday’s post and leaving a comment. Barring that, you can purchase tickets at Portland Nursery, Cornell Farms, Dennis’ Seven Dees, Garden Fever!, Xera Plants or online at www.anld.com.

7 Responses to “ANLD highlights”

  1. Jane / MulchMaid Says:

    You got good pictures of some wonderful details, Ricki. With the crowd, many of those were invisible to me and I’m delighted to see them through your eyes and lens!

  2. ricki Says:

    Jane~And you got some clear shots of some things that never opened up for me, so I’ve referred people to you so they can see it all.

  3. linda Says:

    I like those green sliding doors on the …shed ? I’m looking for ideas my shed re-do . Nice pics !

  4. Casa Mariposa Says:

    I tried using that bendable steel edging but mine didn’t want to bend so it’s lounging rebelliously against the garage wall, smug in its refusal. I prefer soft curves to hard lines but am intrigued when gardeners can use both to emphasize the other. Interesting tour!

  5. ricki Says:

    Linda~Jenni had some great doors made for her garage too, so there you have two good sources.

    Mari~That’s one of those cases where professional installation is probably the way to go. Though I hear Lauren Hall-Berens did her own, so maybe you should talk to her.

  6. Grace Peterson Says:

    Nice photos. I never ceased to be amazed at the talents of people, especially plant people.

  7. ricki Says:

    Grace~And don’t forget the generosity that allows us to keep stealing ideas from one another.

Leave a Reply