blue & yellow, with a bit of red, in a vase


What we have here are a few branches of Berberis replicata, some Ceanothus ‘Blue Jeans’ and the new growth of Pyracantha.


‘Blue Jeans’ was stretching out into the driveway and it was all I could do to keep R from whacking away at it before it began to blue up and I could do double duty pruning and flower arranging. The flowers are still fairly tight buds. As they bloom out, this shrub will produce a cloud of blue.

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The Pyracantha in the front hedgerow are still a bit gangly, but that makes them easier to access for cutting. They, like the Pieris, are at their best when the new leaves appear in striking shades of red.


Here’s what the mature ones look like along another fence line.


The blue and yellow theme continues, along the other side of Delusional drive, with a sea of Veronica peduncularis ‘Georgia Blue’, punctuated by the occasional yellow daffodil.


You have to look closely to notice the little Haworthia daffy’s, but they are one of my favorites.


Another reward for close inspection: the drupes from last year remain on the Berberis stems, adding another layer of interest and a deep burgundy accent.


So let’s have one last look at what I made of it all, then hop on over to see what Cathy (Rambling in the Garden) has in store for us this week.

24 thoughts on “blue & yellow, with a bit of red, in a vase

  1. What a big plot you have there, rickii! The pyracantha grown in the UK has much smaller leaves from yours I think – but don’t you think its coppery foliage seems to wrap around the rest of the contents of your vase like a big ribbon? Looks great with the ceanothus. Thanks for sharing

  2. Very nice, and as I mentioned earlier, the foliage looks like ribbons and bows on the arrangement. The combination is magical! I know what you mean about waiting to trim until the shrubs are finished blooming. Actually, I do this same thing with some invasive flowering plants–I wait until they bloom (but before seeding), then pull them up by the roots and trim them for cut flowers. Might as well enjoy the beauty before pulling/trimming. Your bouquet is lovely.

    • I’m seeing why those branches don’t make it into bouquets often: they bloom out quickly, then start dropping petals and pollen. I guess the standards are standards for a reason.

    • Thanks for pointing that out, Diana. I hadn’t thought about the primaries, mostly because the plants’ interpretations put a nice twist on them that took the rawness away.

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