yard, garden & patio show

I must confess to being a little disappointed in this year’s show. In the past, nurseries were known to pull out all the stops in an effort to outshine one another and go home with ribbons. I only saw one booth that went that route, but then it’s been a hard year. That said, I fired up the camera for a few things I found noteworthy.

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ANLD built this colorful booth.

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Then loaded it up with plants that echoed and/or complemented the jazzy color scheme.

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These large sculptural leaves sprouting from the framework of another booth caught my eye.

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A large glass “tree” seems to be making the rounds of shows. Karen had a picture of it in her post about the Seattle show. The background was so busy that I opted for a close-up, but it was huge.

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My mission was to soak up atmosphere and speakers, not so much to shop. Chief Joseph pines were everywhere. I found some, tiny, in 4″ pots, for $60. Guess I will wait until they become common, which, by the looks of things, they are bound to do. What I did spring for was bulbs of Eucomis ‘Sparkling Burgundy’ and Arisaema triphyllum, a Calluna vulgaris ‘Blazeaway’ to add to my growing heather collection, and Euonymus fortunei ‘Emerald ‘N’ Gold’.

Zeroing in on just a couple of speakers out of so many choices was tough. Sean Hogan of Cistus Nursery spoke about bold foliage for small gardens. His point was that in a small room, filling it with finicky, small furniture makes it feel smaller than bold strokes. Well, we have a large property, but I figure the big stuff is even more important here. Cistus is nearby, so when I’m ready I will just pop on over to see what is available and grill the ever helpful staff. Sean’s talk was more along the lines of high entertainment for this plant-starved winter shut-in. Next, Dan Heims showed us shade plants….lots of shade plants, and filled us in on plant combinations, new introductions, and exactly the conditions to make them happy.

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After all that stimulation, I was ready for a little walk. Miraculously, I had found a parking spot right across the street from the main entrance, so I decided to stroll around the perimeter of the convention center. I like the way plants spill over the balcony and contrast with the sand colored brick.

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Bioswales carry runoff during the rainy months and are lined with draught tolerant grasses and basalt columns for year round interest, with traffic, bridges and skyline as background.

5 Responses to “yard, garden & patio show”

  1. Loree/danger garden Says:

    ricki! We we both in the Sean Hogan and Dan Heims talks! I didn’t see you! (I think I would have recognized you)

    I agree that this years show was a bit of a “let down” the recession seems to be taking its toll on everyone. Your speed in posting is impressive. I fear it make take me a few days to gather my thoughts and actually type them up!

  2. Wendy Says:

    I’m so excited about going to the Philly Flower Show after seeing all these posts about other shows around the world. I believe the large sculptural leaves are from Ikea – you can get your own for a low low price (well, I bet you could easily make you own, right?).

  3. ricki Says:

    Loree~I was looking for you in both of those seminars, and especially during the transition, figuring your limp would be pretty easy to spot. I’m looking forward to your posts about the show in lieu of the hoped for sit-down to compare notes.

    Wendy~ Ikea? Wow! I could never make anything for the kind of prices they charge. The leaves were way cool, wherever they came from. I did craft a four poster bed once, where the posts were palm trees with leaves something like that.

  4. Karen Says:

    Sorry you guys didn’t get as good a show as you deserved. I actually thought Seattle’s was better than in past years. Wonder why the difference? Funny about the “tree” and thanks for the link! Love the bioswale and your heather purchase is marvelous, I have been noticing those reddish ones around here lately and it is making me want to get one despite being bored with the “regular” ones I already have. Do they keep their color year-round or just in winter? Great round-up!

  5. ricki Says:

    Karen~The plant tag says it flowers in late summer on gold and orange foliage which deepens to a brilliant red in winter. I also have some golden ones that hold color year round. There are some public plantings around here on banks where they made patterns using the different colors. I’ll have to try for a good photo of that.

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